How does Benecol help me?

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Recommended in the Guidelines

Plant stanols are compounds, which are found naturally in cereals, fruits and vegetables, mainly as their fatty acid esters, (i.e. Plant stanol ester). The levels obtained from a regular daily diet are too low to be effective in lowering blood cholesterol, which is why Plant stanol ester is added to Benecol foods. With 2 g of plant stanols a day you get the optimal cholesterol lowering effect.

How it work

Use Benecol products daily with your meals. A sufficient daily consumption of Benecol foods lowers your cholesterol by 10-15 % as quickly as in 2-3 weeks. Just take one pasteurized bottle / coffee sachet / UHT drink per day and see the result.

Benecol® – Clinically proven cholesterol-lowering foods recommended in guidelines

Contents

Efficacy proven in more than 70 clinical studies
  • US National Cholesterol Education Program NCEP (2002).
  • European Union Scientific Committee on Foods (2002)
  • International Atherosclerosis Society (2003)
  • International Lipid Information Bureau (2003)
  • WHO/FAO (2003)
  • American Heart Association & American College of Cardiology (2006)
  • Fourth joint task force of European and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease (2007)
  • American Diabetes Association (2008)
  • American Heart Association & American College of Cardiology Foundation (2008)
  • American Academy of Pediatrics (2008)
  • Finnish Diabetes Association: Nutrition recommendation for diabetes (2008)
  • Dyslipidemias: Current Care Guideline, Finland (2009)
  • Australian Heart Foundation (2009)
  • The Finnish National Nutrition Council: Guidelines for nutrition care (2010)
Recommended in the Guidelines

Examples of guidelines recommending that Plant stanol ester should be considered part of a cholesterol lowering diet:

  • European Society of Cardiology & European Atherosclerosis Society, 2016
    The Task Force for the management of dyslipidemias of the European Society of cardiology (ESC) and the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). 2016 ESC/EAS Guidelines for the management of dyslipidemias. Atherosclerosis 2016; 253: 281-344.
  • The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
    in Clinical Practice, 2016 2016 European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. Eur Heart J 2016.
  • American College of Cardiology, 2016
    2016 ACC Expert consensus decision pathway on the role of non-statin therapies for LDL-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. JACC 2016
  • American Diabetes Association, 2016
    Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management. Diabetes Care 2016; 39: S60–S71.
  • European Atherosclerosis Society, 2015
    Wiegman et al. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents: gaining decades of life by optimizing detection and treatment. Eur Heart J 2015
  • National Lipid Association, 2015
    Jacobson et al. National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia: part 1 – full report. J Clin Lipidol 2015: 9; 129-169.
  • Joint British Societies, 2014
    JBS 3 board: Joint British Societies’ consensus recommendations for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (JBS3). Heart 2014; 100: ii1-ii67
  • European Atherosclerosis Society, 2014
    Gylling H et al. Plant sterols and plant stanols in the management of dyslipidaemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Consensus statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society. Atherosclerosis 2014; 232: 346-360.
  • International Atherosclerosis Society, 2013
    An International Atherosclerosis Society Position Paper: Global Recommendations for the Management of Dyslipidemia. http://www.athero.org/IASPositionPaper.asp
  • European Atherosclerosis Society, 2013
    Nordestgaard et al. Familial hypercholesterolaemia is underdiagnosed and undertreated in the general population: guidance for clinicians to prevent coronary heart disease. Consensus statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society. Eur Heart J 2013; 34: 3478-3490.
  • American Diabetes Association, 2013
    Evert AB et al. Nutrition therapy recommendations for the management of adults with diabetes. A position statement of American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2013; 36: 3821-3842.
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2011
    Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics 2011; 128: Suppl 5: S1-S44. NHLBI website
  • The Australian Heart Foundation, 2009
    The Australian Heart Foundation. Position statement on phytosterol/stanol enriched foods 2007, updated December 2009. AHF Website
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, 2008
    Stephen R. Daniels, Frank R. Greer and the Committee on Nutrition. Lipid Screening and Cardiovascular Health in Childhood. Pediatrics 2008; 122: 198-208.
  • American Diabetes Association & American College of Cardiology Foundation, 2008
    Brunzell JD, Davidson M, Furberg CD et al. Lipoprotein Management in Patients With Cardiometabolic Risk: Consensus Conference Report From the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Cardiology Foundation. J Am Coll Cardiol 2008; 51: 1512-24.
  • Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation, 2003
    Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation, Diet, nutrition, and the prevention of chronic diseases. WHO Technical Report Series, No.797 – TRS 797, 2003.
Patient Target Groups

International guidelines encourage health professionals to consider plant stanol ester as part of the management of raised cholesterol especially for the following three patient groups:

  1. Individuals with high LDL cholesterol at low or intermediate cardiovascular risk who do not qualify for statin therapy
  2. High and very high risk patients, such as patients with diabetes, who fail to reach their LDL-cholesterol targets on statins alone, or are statin intolerant
  3. Adults and children with familial hypercholesterolemia

Reference

  1. Gylling et al. EAS Consensus Paper. Plant sterols and plant stanols in the management of dyslipidaemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis 2014; 232: 346-360. http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(13)00694-1/pdf
  2. Catapano et al. 2016 ESC/EAS Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias. Atherosclerosis 2016; 253: 281-344. http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(16)31267-9/pdf
  3. Piepoli et al. 2016 European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. Eur Heart J 2016; 37: 2315–2381. http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/ehj/37/29/2315.full.pdf
  4. International Atherosclerosis Society. IAS Position Paper: Global Recommendations for the Management of Dyslipidemia, 2013. http://www.athero.org/IASPositionPaper.asp
  5. American Diabetes Association. Cardiovascular disease and risk management. Sec. 8. In Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2016. Diabetes Care 2016; 39: S60–S71. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/diacare/39/Supplement_1/S60.full.pdf
  6. Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents: Summary Report. Pediatrics 2011; 128: S213 -S256. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/peds_guidelines_sum.pdf
  7. Nordestgaard et al. EAS Consensus Paper. Familial hypercholesterolaemia is underdiagnosed and undertreated in the general population: guidance for clinicians to prevent coronary heart disease Eur Heart J 2013; 34 (45): 3478-3490. http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/ehj/34/45/3478.full.pdf
  8. Stroes et al. EAS Consensus Paper. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy—European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management. Eur Heart J 2015; 36 (17): 1012-1022. http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/ehj/36/17/1012.full.pdf